Category Archives: translator

Editing is crucial to the translation process

One very crucial step involved in completing a translation project is the editing process. After a translator completes a translation, the document may be sent to a separate individual for editing. Editing is especially used for documents that need to be “print-ready” at the completion of the project so every step must be taken to ensure a near perfect translation. Editing is normally charged per hour whereas translations are generally charged per word.

The main function of an editor is to fix errors such as spelling, grammar, punctuation, missing text, formatting, and they revise any awkward-sounding translations. The editor does this by checking for accuracy of the translation by comparing source document to target document.

Just as the translator must be a native speaker in the language they are translating into, the editor also must be a native speaker to ensure grammatical or contextual errors are virtually non-existent. In other words, the editor needs to be a native speaker for the same reason the translator does. A good editor must have a keen understanding of grammar, context, writing conventions, cultural diversity, and style of the language he/she is working with.

It is also key for the editor to be an expert in their field. Not only does the editor need to understand the language conventions thoroughly, but he/she also needs to be well-versed and experienced in the subject matter in question. If the editor is editing a medical document, it is absolutely vital that the editor also have a background in the medical field.

Many editors find it helpful to use the Track Changes function in Microsoft Word to assist them in the editing process. Many other software types are used to assist editors in their task, but Track Changes is usually the most widely used among the community because of the simplistic nature of this feature. It allows the editor to make the changes he/she wants by inserting, deleting, or moving text or graphics. You can also change formatting using this feature.

Editing is yet another option the client has at their disposal while submitting a translation request. Review the specifications and requirements of your project and decide if editing is the right option for you.

TRANSLATION WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?

“Translation guarantees the survival of our civilization a globalized world.” – Center for Translation Studies, University of Texas at Dallas

Interpreting, Translating & Transcription Services for Today’s Market

For nearly a quarter of a Century, American Language Services (ALS) has been a premier provider of languages services. We provide top quality services for a significant number of Major Corporations, Law Firms and Governmental Agencies in the domestic US market and abroad. We work around the world in all languages for written translations, transcriptions and verbal interpreting. We have built an outstanding reputation for providing timely and cost effective translation, transcription and interpreting services. ALS bridges the communication gap between unique languages and distinct cultures by paying meticulous attention to the details. We know that succeeding globally in today’s business world requires paying attention to many subtle language nuances. Our continuous dedication to the details and meeting our clients’ goals have made AML-Global a worldwide leader in the translation and interpreting industry for both written & verbal communication projects.
AML-Global has thousands of highly qualified language experts on call 24 hours, 7 days a week. Located on every continent in nearly every country around the world, our interpreters and translators are experienced and proficient in speaking and writing hundreds of languages within an extensive range of specific industries.

Successful Communication Requires More Than Written Translations and Verbal Interpretations

Whether it is in written form through the translation process or through verbal interpreting, AML-Global pays particular attention to the subtle differences in language that are critical in conveying your message to your target audience. In many cases, a simple verbatim translation is not enough. Communicating effectively requires projecting the intent of the message, addressing cultural awareness of your audience, as well as understanding specific nuances in various language combinations. AML-Global provides effective language solutions needed to make a positive impact on your target audience.

It’s no surprise that the word ‘translation’ is often misinterpreted. By looking up the word in any dictionary source, you may stumble across up to fifteen different definitions. According to the online Latin dictionary, the word for translation, translatio, is derived from words meaning to carry or to bring across—a fitting etymology as translation brings the world together and bridges cultural divides. Although the Latin definition of the word appears to be the most fitting explanation, there are many misconceptions surrounding the word. Let’s start with the basics.

Translation is often confused with interpreting or transcription, but its differences are inherent. Interpreting is the relaying of verbal information in one language to verbal communication in another. Interpreting is utilized for legal proceedings, conferences, trade shows, meetings and social gatherings of all kinds. Transcription is the transformation of verbal communication into a written form of communication, where information is transcribed from CDs, DVDs, cassettes, and various other digital and media sources. Translation is a written communication which originates in one written language and changed into another; the source language and the target language, respectively. Translation is used for software programming, legal documents, and various corporate communications.

Additionally, there are several things to consider with translation, besides the basic comprehension of language. It is an extremely common misconception that anyone who is bilingual can be a good translator. This is certainly not the case. A good translator goes through rigorous testing and hones his/her craft for many years to become an expert translator.

A translator must also have a keen understanding of grammar, context, writing conventions, cultural diversity, and language style of the two languages. People often believe that there is always a simple exact match between different languages, but that is almost never the case. A good translator must determine proper terminology based on his or her comprehension of the languages, subject matter, and cultural/colloquial meanings.

For instance, the word tortilla is also tortilla in American English, but called a pancake in British English and one would not want to confuse the two! This is an important colloquial and cultural difference that a successful translator would need to know in order to properly convey an idea from English to Spanish or vice versa.
Translation has been Making the World a Little Smaller since the beginning of written literature, and is the glue that holds the world together today, Bridging Communication Gaps on a daily basis in advertising, legal documentation, literature, and even film. Here at AML-Global we’ve proudly provided that “glue” for nearly a quarter of a century, and will continue our dedication to Making the World a Little Smaller with translation for years to come.